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ITC IRE Assessment (Level 3)

Assignment:

Family Newsletter – When completing this assignment refer to your textbook to help you formulate this newsletter. You may do this letter in Word as a letter type newsletter with a few graphics added OR any other template that would be accessible to you.

Your assessment requires you to create a family newsletter to send home with the infants/toddlers in your class. Include information for parents in each of the following domains of development:

  • Social/emotional development (ideas include information on play groups, how to deal with challenging behaviors like biting or hitting, information on attachment, information on separation anxiety, ways to promote self-regulation in children, etc.)
  • Cognitive development (ideas for parents on age appropriate toys and activities to build cognitive skills; developmentally appropriate activities for parents and children to do together)
  • Language development (book suggestions, finger plays, songs, nursery rhymes, using sign language with infants and toddlers, etc.)
  • Physical development (ideas include physical activity ideas that parents can do at home, healthy snacks/meal recipes, information regarding dental care, vaccinations, etc., information regarding exclusion criteria for children when they are sick, etc.)
  • Additional information to include-
    • Art/ Activity ideas, information on what is happening in the classroom (field trips, theme of the week/month, recent achievements, upcoming events, quotes from children, etc.)
    • Information on developmental milestones that happen in the infant/toddler years
    • Include a cultural component- a song in both English and Spanish if you have Spanish-speaking students in your class, multicultural books, recipes

ITC Competencies

IRE1: Identifies the importance of healthy practitioner-parent interactions and relationships in nurturing the development, learning, mental-health, and well-being of young children, birth to age three.
IRE2: Describes interactions and strategies that support healthy infant/toddler development, learning, mental health, and well-being and how these can be integrated into daily routines.
IRE4: Integrates family experience, cultural practices and perspectives, and knowledge of childrenring beliefs and practices into the infant/toddler setting.

NAEYC

1c, 2a, 2b, 4a, 4b, 4c, 6d

IPTS

8A, 8B, 8D 8g, 8H, 8J, 9A, 9B, 9C, 9D, 9F

Original ITC Gateways Benchmarks

2-4A6, 2-4B9, 2-4E1-4, 2-4E8, 2-4E11, 2-4E16, 2-4G5, 2-4G6, 5A6, 5B9, 5E8, 5E16, 5F9

I

Assessment Rubric (pulled from ITC Master Rubrics)

ITC IRE Assessment (Level 3): Family Newsletter Rubric

Competency

Distinguished

Proficient

Needs Improvement

Unsatisfactory

Unable to Assess

IRE1:

Identifies the importance of healthy practitioner-parent interactions and relationships in nurturing the development, learning, mental-health, and well-being of young children, birth to age three.

NAEYC: 2a, 2b, 4a

IPTS: 8A, 8G

ITC: 2-4E2

Explains how positive practitioner-parent interactions and relationships are essential in supporting the development, learning, mental-health, and well-being of young children, birth to age three.

Uses research to as a rationale to support explanation.

Explains how positive practitioner-parent interactions and relationships are essential in supporting the development, learning, mental-health, and well-being of young children, birth to age three.

Identifies the relationship between positive practitioner-parent interactions and relationships and supporting the development, learning, mental-health, and well-being of young children, birth to age three.

Inaccurate or incomplete identification of the relationship between positive practitioner-parent interactions and relationships and supporting the development, learning, mental-health, and well-being of young children, birth to age three.

IRE2:

Describes interactions and strategies that support healthy infant/toddler development, learning, mental health, and well-being and how these can be integrated into daily routines.

NAEYC: 1c, 4a, 4b, 4c

IPTS: 8A, 8B

ITC: 2-4E1, 2-4E4, 2-4E8, 2-4E11, 5E8

Provides examples of how interactions that support learning core tasks of early development (e.g., those that foster attachment, self-regulation, and self-concept) can be integrated into daily care giving and play routines.

Names strategies (e.g., using non-verbal signals such as eye contact and gestures; using verbal language) to support early communication and language in infants and toddlers of different ages.

Names characteristics of interactions (e.g., responsive) that promote and support the healthy development of infant/toddlers’ emotional security and expression, self-regulation, and self-confidence to explore and learn.

Uses research to as a rationale to support strategies/examples provided.

Provides examples of how interactions that support learning core tasks of early development (e.g., those that foster attachment, self-regulation, and self-concept) can be integrated into daily care giving and play routines.

Names strategies (e.g., using non-verbal signals such as eye contact and gestures; using verbal language) to support early communication and language in infants and toddlers of different ages.

Names characteristics of interactions (e.g., responsive) that promote and support the healthy development of infant/toddlers’ emotional security and expression, self-regulation, and self-confidence to explore and learn.

Provides partial examples of how interactions that support learning core tasks of early development (e.g., those that foster attachment, self-regulation, and self-concept) can be integrated into daily care giving and play routines.

Names strategies (e.g., using non-verbal signals such as eye contact and gestures; using verbal language) to support early communication or language in infants and toddlers of different ages.

Names characteristics of interactions.

Provides of interactions.

Identifies strategies that inhibit communication and/or language in infants and toddlers of different ages.

Partially or inaccurately names characteristics of interactions (e.g., responsive) that promote and support the healthy development of infant/toddlers’ emotional security and expression, self-regulation, and self-confidence to explore and learn.

IRE4:

Integrates family experience, cultural practices and perspectives, and knowledge of childrearing beliefs and practices into the infant/toddler setting.

NAEYC: 1a, 1b, 2a, 2c, 6d

IPTS: 8D, 8H, 8J, 9A, 9B, 9C, 9D, 9F

ITC: 2-4A6, 2-4B9, 2-4E3, 2-4E16, 2-4G5, 2-4G6, 5A6, 5B9, 5E16, 5F9

Provides examples of how families’ experiences, knowledge, and childrearing beliefs and practices can be incorporated into practices in early care and education settings.

Identifies ways in which individual differences in cultural, familial, and linguistic heritage influence perceptions of infancy, and thereby influence communication and interactions with infants and toddlers.

Provides examples that illustrate why it is important for early childhood practitioners to understand cultural nuances in family health practices and parents’ views of their child.

Explains how culture impacts families’ perspectives about their infant toddler, parenting, and the services they value, and how cultural ideas about infants/toddlers and about parenting have implications for working with individual children and their families.

Supports families as current and future advocates for integration of family experience, cultural practices and perspectives, and knowledge of childrearing beliefs and practices into future educational settings.

Provides examples of how families’ experiences, knowledge, and childrearing beliefs and practices can be incorporated into practices in early care and education settings.

Identifies ways in which individual differences in cultural, familial, and linguistic heritage influence perceptions of infancy, and thereby influence communication and interactions with infants and toddlers.

Provides examples that illustrate why it is important for early childhood practitioners to understand cultural nuances in family health practices and parents’ views of their child.

Explains how culture impacts families’ perspectives about their infant toddler, parenting, and the services they value, and how cultural ideas about infants/toddlers and about parenting have implications for working with individual children and their families.

Provides limited examples of how families’ experiences, knowledge, and childrearing beliefs and practices can be incorporated into practices in early care and education settings.

Identifies ways in which individual differences in cultural, familial, and linguistic heritage influence perceptions of infancy.

Provides limited examples that illustrate why it is important for early childhood practitioners to understand cultural nuances in family health practices and parents’ views of their child.

Partially explains how culture impacts families’ perspectives about their infant toddler, parenting, and the services they value, and include limited explanation of how cultural ideas about infants/toddlers and about parenting have implications for working with individual children and their families.

Provides inaccurate or incomplete examples of how families’ experiences, knowledge, and childrearing beliefs and practices can be incorporated into practices in early care and education settings.

Inaccurately identifies ways in which individual differences in cultural, familial, and linguistic heritage influence perceptions of infancy, and thereby influence communication and interactions with infants and toddlers.

Provides inaccurate or incomplete examples that illustrate why it is important for early childhood practitioners to understand cultural nuances in family health practices and parents’ views of their child.

Provides an incorrect explanation of how culture impacts families’ perspectives about their infant toddler, parenting, and the services they value, and how cultural ideas about infants/toddlers and about parenting have implications for working with individual children and their families.

Yellow – Level 2 Green – Level 3

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